Thoughts on Writing About Sex… and a Whole Can of Anxious Worms I Didn’t Even Mean to Open

This begins as a follow-up to Monday’s post How To Have Socially Anxious Sex In 4 Easyย Steps, then pretty quickly devolves into something much less organized and much more personal.

Mission: success

The post was very well received, both here and on Instagram.

On Instagram, many women messaged me privately to thank me for bringing up the topic (social anxiety + sex) and to share a glimpse into their experiences.

Constructive criticism

One (gentle) critique I received was that the post was more superficial and less candid/personal than my usual style.

And that’s true.

I was testing the waters with the topic, so I stayed in the shallow end.

Now that I’m pretty sure there are no sharks in the deep end, I may open up more about how social anxiety has impacted my sex life and sexuality.

The role of partners

One comment that came up among people with partners is that their partners struggled to understand how and why social anxiety was connected to sex. I definitely see a post in there.

Presence in intimate relationships

Another comment was that it was somewhat surprising that social anxiety would be present in such an intimate relationship. I think it just reinforces the fact that this is a disorder, ever-present in a person’s life. Another post idea there.

Sex educator

I haven’t mentioned this anywhere before, but years ago, I truly thought sex education was my calling.

I thought about starting a sexual health and wellness blog and looked into what it means to be a sex educator.

I didn’t pursue it… in retrospect, I think social anxiety stood in my way.

But I’ve always had an open-minded, accepting philosophy toward sex and sexuality, and I still like the idea of being someone people feel comfortable talking to about this sort of thing.

But let’s not get carried away

As much as I think the intersection of sex and social anxiety is fascinating, I don’t plan on making any major pivots to focusing only on this topic.

Random but related

I’ve had a post idea brewing in the back of my mind.

It would be called 10 Things You’ll Hate About Me, and it would be a list of things I don’t tell most people about myself, primarily because social anxiety (fear of judgment and rejection) holds me back.

I’m mentioning it here because sexuality and my beliefs in that area would make the list.

But I’ve also been mulling over the difference between being candid versus being indiscreet. Being vulnerable versus being TMI.

And I also want to be sure I have the right motivations for such a post: would I be sharing all this to challenge myself to show up as MYSELF more, or would I be doing it as a sort of approval seeking — almost daring people to reject me so that I can stop waiting for the day it happens naturally?

Do I feel like I need to lay my soul bare before I can be accepted as myself… and before *I* can accept myself?

These are the things I think about when I am thinking too much about too many things.

Loosening up?

Social anxiety and perfectionism tend to keep me quite buttoned-up and proper in how I approach things. All things. Every thing.

On my blog, I write candidly in terms of content, but I do it in a structured, heavily edited, hugely overthought kind of way.

Rather than just sharing the day to day stuff.

Which is fine. Not every blogger does journal-style posts, and variety is the spice of life.

But what kind of blogger would I be if I wasn’t so worried about “blogging the right way according to YouTube videos that I binge watch as a substitute for confident self-direction”?

“Tidy outfit” Blogging versus “comfy tee and jeggings” Blogging

I candidly share my carefully packaged thoughts — but I don’t share the self-questioning process behind those posts. And maybe that would be interesting to share.

You see the written equivalent of me dressed for the day, outfit carefully chosen, and hair brushed and straightened.

But what would it look like if I shared the written equivalent of everything before that point? When I’m getting ready, talking myself up for things, walking around in comfy clothes?

Consistency is not my forte

I seem to go back and forth and side to side on how I want to do things. The answer is probably in the grey area between extremes.

My perfectionist self hates acknowledging the grey area, even though my rational self knows that this is where healthy thinking lies.

And now we get down to the core of it

And I also know that more people from “real life” read my blog than do my Instagram posts.

I don’t want them to discover that I’m not as clever as I wish I was. Were. Am. Are’m… arm?

If I let my bloggy hair down, I might make spelling mistakes, say something that could potentially be misunderstood and criticized, or say something completely dull-headed.

OMG WHAT IF THEY ALREADY KNOW THAT I’M NOT AS CLEVER AS I WISH, BUT I DON’T KNOW THAT THEY KNOW, AND THEY DON’T KNOW THAT I WONDER IF THEY KNOW, AND ALL THIS TIME I’VE BEEN TRYING TO BE PERFECT WHEN THEY’VE ACTUALLY BEEN SEEING AND LIKING MY IMPERFECTIONS ALL ALONG.

And on that note of mental crystal clarity, I bid you good night.

How To Have Socially Anxious Sex In 4 Easy Steps

Content warning: …sex. Obviously. (Not too graphic though.)


Step 1:

Start with all the typical fears related to social anxiety.

To name just a few:

Being judged by others in social situations

Being embarrassed or humiliated — and showing it by blushing, sweating, or shaking

Accidentally offending someone

Being the center of attention

Source: WebMD

Step 2:

Hold on tight to those fears as you remove all your clothing.

You are now naked.

Proceed to step 3.

Step 3:

Continue to hold on tight to those fears as you turn to other human or humans in room.

Note that they, too, are naked.

And looking at you.

Step 4:

Prepare to interact with other human(s) in the most intimate way imaginable.

Now.

Right now.

Congratulations!

You are now ready to have socially anxious sex.

But Seriously Though

It’s not your fault if anxiety is creating challenges for you related to intimacy or sex.

You didn’t choose to have anxiety in the bedroom any more than you chose to have it outside the bedroom.

Anxiety doesn’t END at the bedroom door

(I keep saying bedroom but feel free to replace this with your sexy location of choice.)

Anxiety is hard enough to manage during non-sexy times, and it affects an individual’s whole life.

So it only makes sense that these challenges would carry over into the bedroom. You’re still the same person there, after all.

Anxiety can be a mood killer

It can be physically difficult, if not impossible, to relax enough to enjoy the moment. (No relaxy, no climaxy.)

Medication can be a factor

SSRI and SNRI medications can cause sexual side effects.

This can be infuriating, embarrassing, and discouraging. (There are ways to mitigate this effect depending on the medication. For example, for me, adding Wellbutrin [buproprion] offset the anorgasmia caused by SNRI and SSRI medication. Talk to your doc.)

Anxiety is pretty common here anyway

Sex can be nerve-wracking even without an anxiety disorder in the mix.

It can be fun but scary, exhilarating but finicky, restorative but messy. (So messy.)

Moral of the story: We’re all imperfect

Please don’t be too hard on your imperfect self for being imperfect in the bedroom, too.

Anxiety disorder or not, WE ARE *ALL* IMPERFECT IN THE BEDROOM.

AND DON’T LET ANYONE MAKE YOU BELIEVE OTHERWISE.

xoxo

P.S. Why I Wrote This Post

The impact of social anxiety on sexuality is a legitimate issue that I would love to see discussed in a candid and relatable way.

Theย tone I aimed for here isย lighthearted and hopefully a little funny.

This isn’t “the” definitive post on socially anxious sex.

I’m just hoping to open the door to more conversation and thought.

And even if there’s no public talk, maybe someone out there will feel a little less alone and a little more understood. xoxo

Do You See What I See? (Thinking Back To My Shy Teens)

There have been times when I’ve thought back on my teens and 20s, and wondered:

Did my debilitating shyness and untreated social anxiety come across as me being unfriendly or thinking I was too good to make friends?



In high school, I was an anxious overachiever.

  • I always aimed for A+ and panicked if it didn’t happen (or seemed like it might not happen).
  • I memorized every detail I could before a test (but was too fretful to ever pause to digest the information).
  • I became editor-in-chief of the high school yearbook because I NEEDED TO MATTER.

Beneath the surface, hidden from even my own insight and self-awareness, I was riddled with anxiety, perfectionism, and rock-bottom self-esteem.

Years later, a former classmate made an offhand comment that I don’t remember verbatim, but it came down to “you were too good to hang out with us.”

My teenage self would have been mortified to hear this.

That shy, lost, neurotic 16-year-old who wanted nothing more than to stop feeling like she only mattered if she was perfect.

There is so much I would go back and tell that girl. So much pain and burden I would try to take off her shoulders.

I had no idea how I came across back then. All I wanted to know was, “Am I okay yet? Am I good enough now? Is this right?”



I’m 34 now

  • I still don’t have a good sense of how I come across to others.
  • I wonder if my “extra-ness” and nerdiness and perfectionism come across as stuck-up or goody-two-shoes.
  • I wonder if my empathy and vulnerability and people-pleasing nature peg me as an underdog, a sort of homely but hopeless puppy.
  • I wonder if my social anxiety and shyness make me seem flakey and cold and uninvested.

These worries are becoming easier to manage as I grow and heal.

Most of the time, they are background music that I can consciously tune out. The music takes over only in my hurting moments.

But I’ve come a long way. I’ve learned that imperfect is way more relatable.

And that it’s better to be the flawed, friendly person at the party than the aloof cool kid that everyone is afraid to approach. (Not that I was “cool” anyway.)

Is This a realistic goal?

I want to get to a solid place of not needing to care either way.

I want my sense of self and self-esteem to be so unshakable that I just do my thing, appearances and perceptions be damned.

But I’m prepared to accept that I still have a lot to learn about all this.

I Am Not Social Anxiety (And Neither Are You) โฃ

I am not social anxiety, but I accept it as part of my life.

I’m still working in the direction of “recovery,” but I’ve made space for a lot of nuance in what I think that looks like. โฃ

I think I used to equate recovery with “cure,” and I used to think “cured” meant no longer socially anxious or held back by “shyness” or “introversion” at all. โฃ

But that mindset came from a place of unnecessary and hurtful self-rejection. โฃ

Self-acceptance

I had to shift to a place of self-acceptance before any recovery could really take place. โฃAnd there have been some other changes, too:

  • I stopped viewing shyness or introversion negatively once I realized they weren’t the same thing as social anxiety (or as one another).
  • I’ve started to see social anxiety disorder as the thing that makes me censor myself from the world. โฃEven from myself sometimes. Recovery has meant learning to turn down the censor and let the real me emerge. โฃ
  • Perhaps most importantly, I’ve learned that self-shame is just not a useful tool for recovery.

Not broken

I’m learning to accept that who I am inside is ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฐ๐˜ต the problem. And that recovery doesn’t mean “fixing” the real me within.

I’m not broken.

Please don’t beat yourself up if you experience social anxiety. You’re not bad or weak or broken.

You are not social anxiety.

xoxo

I’m Not an Expert (Hello New Readers! + Mini Update)

โฃHello there, new readers (and oldie-but-goodies)!

โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃI’m Sadie.โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ


โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃI’ve had a bit of growth on my blog and Instagram account recently, so I wanted to take a quick moment of your precious time to re-state that ๐˜’๐˜ฎ ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฐ๐˜ต ๐˜ข ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ๐˜ต๐˜ข๐˜ญ ๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ญ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ ๐˜ฑ๐˜ณ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง๐˜ฆ๐˜ด๐˜ด๐˜ช๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ๐˜ข๐˜ญ.โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ

Just as a sort of disclaimer for my own peace of mind.


General update for readers old and new

I’m going to experiment with my posting schedule and post styles for the next couple of weeks. Jesse has been super helpful as a sounding board on all this. โค

I need something to help with my blogger’s block and blogging perfectionism that I’m struggling with since I decided to make my Monday posts “BIG DEAL POLISHED PIECES.” (Maybe I’ll do an actual post on THAT, too.)

Just as a heads-up if you start seeing me more often and/or more informally. I hope you’ll bear with me!


โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃMy account has always been about sharing ๐ฐ๐ก๐š๐ญ ๐ข๐ญ ๐Ÿ๐ž๐ž๐ฅ๐ฌ ๐ฅ๐ข๐ค๐ž ๐ญ๐จ ๐ก๐š๐ฏ๐ž ๐ฌ๐จ๐œ๐ข๐š๐ฅ ๐š๐ง๐ฑ๐ข๐ž๐ญ๐ฒ ๐Ÿ๐ซ๐จ๐ฆ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ข๐ง๐ฌ๐ข๐๐ž. โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ

โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃI share my reflections on what I have learned (and am still learning) from therapy and beyond, but it always comes from a ๐ฉ๐ž๐ซ๐ฌ๐จ๐ง๐š๐ฅ ๐ฉ๐ž๐ซ๐ฌ๐ฉ๐ž๐œ๐ญ๐ข๐ฏ๐ž. โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ

โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃThere are some fabulous therapists and coaches out there. โฃโฃโฃโฃ

โฃโฃโฃโฃI’m neither of those things.

(๐˜ ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ, ๐˜ ๐˜ฉ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฑ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ ๐˜ฉ๐˜ข๐˜ท๐˜ฆ ๐˜ง๐˜ข๐˜ฃ๐˜ถ๐˜ญ๐˜ฐ๐˜ถ๐˜ด ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ๐˜ต๐˜ด ๐˜ฃ๐˜ถ๐˜ต ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ข๐˜ต’๐˜ด ๐˜ฃ๐˜ฆ๐˜ด๐˜ช๐˜ฅ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฑ๐˜ฐ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ๐˜ต.)โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ

โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃI want to share my own ๐ซ๐š๐ฐ ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ซ๐ž๐š๐ฅ ๐ž๐ฑ๐ฉ๐ž๐ซ๐ข๐ž๐ง๐œ๐ž๐ฌ so that, hopefully, ๐ฒ๐จ๐ฎ ๐Ÿ๐ž๐ž๐ฅ ๐ฅ๐ž๐ฌ๐ฌ ๐š๐ฅ๐จ๐ง๐ž if you’re going through similar things or know someone who is. โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ

โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ๐˜ ๐˜ฉ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฑ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ข๐˜ต ๐˜ฎ๐˜บ ๐˜ด๐˜ต๐˜ฐ๐˜ณ๐˜บ ๐˜ค๐˜ข๐˜ฏ ๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ๐˜ญ๐˜ฑ ๐˜บ๐˜ฐ๐˜ถ ๐˜ข๐˜ญ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฏ๐˜จ ๐˜บ๐˜ฐ๐˜ถ๐˜ณ ๐˜ซ๐˜ฐ๐˜ถ๐˜ณ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฆ๐˜บ ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ ๐˜ด๐˜ฐ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ด๐˜ฎ๐˜ข๐˜ญ๐˜ญ ๐˜ธ๐˜ข๐˜บ.

โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃI’d love to have you follow along so we can learn from each other :)โฃโฃ

Now I’d love to hear from you!

What do you like to share on your own blog?

๐Ÿ‘‡๐Ÿ˜˜๐Ÿ‘‡โฃโฃโฃโฃโฃโฃ

online test for social anxiety reviews

I Took 4 Online Tests for Social Anxiety: Here Are My Results

In 2018, I did a 12-week group therapy program for social anxiety (I talk about some aspects of the program in this post).

As part of the program, we were regularly asked to complete a questionnaire to track our level of social anxiety.

At the beginning of the program, my score was at the highest end of Severe, on a scale of Mild, Moderate, Severe, and Very Severe.

At the end of the program, it was at the lowest end of Severe. (Progress!)

During the program, I briefly went into the Very Severe range (it was around the time we started doing exposure therapy). But I also dipped down to the lowest end of Moderate during the program as well.

Anxiety levels vary with time and circumstances and many other factors. That’s why they scored us weekly — to see the overall picture.

It’s been a while since I had a formal assessment, so I was curious to see where I might fall on some online tests.

I included some screenshots of my answers and scores.

Read on, friends! I hope you find the post interesting. ๐Ÿ™‚


Test 1:

PSYCOM Social Anxiety Test

My score on this test:

“Strong indication of social anxiety disorder (social phobia).”

Question example:

“Are you extremely conscious of your actions when in social settings because you fear they might offend someone or you could be rejected?”

My answer: Very often.

Thoughts:

I like the way the score is phrased here: “Strong indication of.” It makes it extra clear that this is not a diagnostic tool.

They include an image of where your score falls on anxiety-ometer (what would you call this?), but I’m not sure how meaningful it is, especially compared to, say, the ranges included in the results for Test 3 below.


Test 2:

Psychology Today Social Anxiety Test

My score on this test:

“No strengths.” (Fabulous.)

Question example:

“I blush frequently when talking to others.”

My answer: Completely true. (Hence the title of my blog.)

THOUGHTS:

You have to pay $6.95 to see the full tests results (which I guess is fair? the other sites don’t charge though), and they do tell you about the fee before you start the test.

The results they give you for free are not terribly insightful — they are more of a categorization of things you may already know about yourself. I read it and thought, “Well, yeah. Obviously.”

I wouldn’t recommend this test, unless maybe you want to buy the full report, but I can’t actually speak to the contents of the reports they give.


Test 3:

MIND DIAGNOSTICS

Social Anxiety Disorder Test

My score on this test:

“Extreme Social Anxiety (49/72).”

Question example:

“How often do you avoid expressing disagreement or disapproval to someone you don’t know well?”

My answer: Usually.

THOUGHTS:

My answer to that question above would actually be “always,” but that was not a choice.

They give you your full results, and the option of either signing up with your email address or skipping to results.

I like the language they use: “may be experiencing extreme social anxiety.” Not “you may HAVE extreme social anxiety” or “you may be SUFFERING FROM extreme social anxiety.”

I don’t personally mind if people use words like have or suffer from conversationally, but in the context of a test like this, I think neutral language is valuable.

I also like that they show you the score ranges.


Test 4:

Social Anxiety Institute

Test for Social Anxiety Disorder

My score on this test:

“71/90: High amount of social anxiety.”

Question example:

“Answering your phone without looking at who’s calling.”

My answer: High.

THOUGHTS:

The questions were straightforward, and I liked the colour-coded answers.

I did find myself wishing there was an option for “very high,” because there were a lot of situations where I would feel more anxiety than the situations where I said “high.”

For example, I would say “high” to a statement like, “answering the phone,” period. If you add “without looking at who’s calling,” then my anxiety level becomes “very high.”

(As in, I would absolutely never do that. That’s why we have voicemail. And google. For number checking.)

Oh and you do have to give your email address to access the results.


Final thoughts

Honestly, I really enjoy taking tests, whether they’re for mental health or personality or “What Kind of Pusheen Are You?

(I’m a Classic Pusheen at the moment, apparently.)

But that’s for another post.

In terms of my results on these four social anxiety tests, I have a few thoughts:

A little surprised

On the one hand, I’m a little surprised that I scored so high on the social anxiety scales, considering the therapy I’ve done and the fact that I’m showing up candidly and somewhat confidently on my blog and Instagram.

(It helps that there aren’t any non-child-non-husband humans around when I write.)

Lockdown effects?

On the other hand, the results are perhaps being skewed by the effects of the lengthy lockdown (entering week 8 as I write this).

I’m not seeing anyone but family, and tensions are just generally high in public. And, you know, globally.

Change how you look at progress

Even with therapy, I haven’t “erased” social anxiety from my life. I get anxious about many of the same things, to varying degrees.

The difference is that I’ve learned to better tolerate the anxiety.

Maybe if there was a test that measured “ability to function with/tolerate social anxiety,” those results would reflect my progress.

That’s a takeaway I’m pretty happy with, actually.


Three more tests

I was concerned about making the post too long, so I’m just going to list these here in case you want to take them yourself:


Disclaimer

This post is entirely for information/entertainment purposes, and not meant to provide instructions on treating or diagnosing any mental health concerns. Doctors first, always. xox


Have you taken any of these tests?

Feel free to talk about your results or thoughts in the comments!

I always enjoy your lovely comments. ๐Ÿ™‚

How I Deal With Self-Doubt as a Shy Blogger (6 tips)

I wrote a post in January where I shared the inherent challenge in blogging about what it’s like to be shy or have social anxiety.

Basically, the thing you’re blogging about is also the thing that makes you feel like you should hold back from blogging at all. Here’s that post:

Today I wanted to share some ideas on how to shift your mindset away from self-doubt, self-consciousness, and imposter syndrome, so that you can calm some of that creative anxiety.

I hope you enjoy!

Related post: I’m Having Social Anxiety About My Social Anxiety Blog


#1. Trust that your REAL is better than your “perfect.”

Photo from Canva Pro

Don’t wait to share your thoughts until that fantasy moment when you finally achieve perfection…

… because that moment will never come.

Even if you get to the place you currently think of as “perfect,” your inner perfectionist will just try to move the bar higher and tell you that you’re still not good enough to relax and feel confident.

Your inner perfectionist is wrong: you are already good enough! Share your voice.


#2. Realize that other people don’t see you the way you see yourself.

Photo from Canva Pro

I’ve had so many people tell me how shocked they were to find out I have severe social anxiety.

They always thought I was confident and had my shit together. (HA!)

No matter how “honest” we think we are being with ourselves, there’s a very good chance we’re magnifying our own shortcomings and minimizing our strengths.

No one is tracking your ups and downs as closely as you are.

(Have you kept track of every time I’ve made a typo on this blog or shared a thought that wasn’t earth-shatteringly insightful? Almost certainly not.)

Related reading: Ashley from Mental Health @ Home recently did a post called Do Your Blog Posts Say What You Think They Do? on the potential disconnect between what we put out there and how others interpret it. Definitely worth a read!


#3. Keep in mind that you may help people without ever finding out about it.

Photo from Canva Pro

How often do you read a blog post without leaving a comment, even if you enjoyed the content?

That’s okay! There’s no obligation to engage with a blogger, Instagrammer, YouTuber, or any other kind of content creator. (Although it is usually appreciated!)

So if you’re ever feeling like you aren’t having an impact, just consider that for every person who does like or comment, there could be 10 more who also enjoy your post but (for whatever harmless reason) don’t interact with you.

You won’t always get to know the impact of what you put out there, but that doesn’t mean you aren’t creating value for others.


#4. Accept that you will feel self-doubt.

Photo from Canva Pro

Fear can co-exist with creativity and expression.

It takes courage to put yourself out there as an imperfect person. It takes strength to show vulnerability. It’s easier to conceal our soft spots, including from ourselves.

If you can learn to accept that you will feel self-doubt and stop trying to fight it, you can redirect that energy toward creating and sharing content even while feeling unsure.


#5. Think of it as joining the conversation.

Photo from Canva Pro

Not every post has to be epic.

You don’t have to save the world with every piece of content.

Try to create some mental space between your content and yourself. That way, you can think of creating content as contributing your thoughts to the ongoing conversation rather than baring your very soul and deepest self to the world.

Which sounds TERRIFYING even in the hypothetical.


#6. Take your own advice.

Photo from Canva Pro

Think of what you might tell your best friend if they confided in you and said, “My ideas are garbage. I can’t do this.”

Now tell those things to yourself, because the shy writer inside you needs a best friend, and that best friend is you.


Those are my 6 tips for putting your thoughts into the world even if you struggle with self-doubt! I hope you found them relatable.

These ideas are not (sadly) magic pills that I can just take and then go create content fearlessly. I have to work through shyness and self-doubt every day.

Some days I’m not in the right head space to even want to feel more confident (the self-sabotage struggle is real).

But they do help me: I’ve managed to put out 47 blog posts and 140+ Instagram posts since rebooting my blog and account in November 2019 (aaaaah!!!).

So, from one self-conscious creator to another: YOU CAN DO THIS!!!!!!

You don’t have to be perfect to bring value to others.

Besides. Has holding yourself back made you doubt yourself LESS? I say we might as well put ourselves out there.


What are some ways you deal with imposter syndrome and that niggling inner voice of self-doubt?

P.S. This post was partly inspired by something I shared on Instagram last Tuesday:

View this post on Instagram

This is sort of a post about ๐ข๐ฆ๐ฉ๐จ๐ฌ๐ญ๐ž๐ซ ๐ฌ๐ฒ๐ง๐๐ซ๐จ๐ฆ๐ž and sort of a post about ๐Ÿ๐ž๐ž๐ฅ๐ข๐ง๐ ๐ฌ ๐š๐ง๐ ๐ฆ๐ข๐ง๐๐ฌ๐ž๐ญ.โฃโฃ โฃโฃ So, I'm not an expert at mental health or motherhood, yet that's what I blog and post about.โฃโฃ โฃโฃ And I think it's because I'm coming from the perspective of an ๐ž๐ฆ๐ฉ๐š๐ญ๐ก๐ž๐ญ๐ข๐œ ๐จ๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ๐ญ๐ก๐ข๐ง๐ค๐ž๐ซ.โฃโฃ โฃโฃ I feel deeply — my own emotions and those of others. And I think… and overthink… everything. โฃโฃ โฃโฃ But ๐ˆ ๐๐จ๐ง'๐ญ ๐ญ๐ก๐ข๐ง๐ค ๐ข๐ญ'๐ฌ ๐š ๐ฐ๐ž๐š๐ค๐ง๐ž๐ฌ๐ฌ ๐ญ๐จ ๐›๐ž ๐š๐ง ๐ž๐ฆ๐ฉ๐š๐ญ๐ก๐ž๐ญ๐ข๐œ ๐จ๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ๐ญ๐ก๐ข๐ง๐ค๐ž๐ซ.โฃโฃ โฃโฃ I think it makes us intuitive and introspective and gives us a lot of insight to share on a range of topics!โฃโฃ โฃโฃ That mindset helps me shush the inner voice of imposter syndrome when I'm thinking of sharing my thoughts and writing.โฃโฃ โฃโฃ (๐˜๐˜ฐ๐˜ณ ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ด๐˜ข๐˜ฌ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ฐ๐˜ง ๐˜ต๐˜ณ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ๐˜ด๐˜ฑ๐˜ข๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ๐˜ค๐˜บ, ๐˜ ๐˜ด๐˜ต๐˜ช๐˜ญ๐˜ญ ๐˜ด๐˜ต๐˜ณ๐˜ถ๐˜จ๐˜จ๐˜ญ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ธ๐˜ช๐˜ต๐˜ฉ ๐˜ช๐˜ฎ๐˜ฑ๐˜ฐ๐˜ด๐˜ต๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ ๐˜ด๐˜บ๐˜ฏ๐˜ฅ๐˜ณ๐˜ฐ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ธ๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฏ ๐˜ช๐˜ต ๐˜ค๐˜ฐ๐˜ฎ๐˜ฆ๐˜ด ๐˜ต๐˜ฐ ๐˜ด๐˜ฑ๐˜ฆ๐˜ข๐˜ฌ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ๐˜จ ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ ๐˜ข ๐˜ท๐˜ช๐˜ฅ๐˜ฆ๐˜ฐ, ๐˜ญ๐˜ช๐˜ฌ๐˜ฆ ๐˜ช๐˜ฏ ๐˜ข๐˜ฏ ๐˜๐˜ฏ๐˜ด๐˜ต๐˜ข ๐˜š๐˜ต๐˜ฐ๐˜ณ๐˜บ. ๐˜‰๐˜ถ๐˜ต ๐˜'๐˜ญ๐˜ญ ๐˜จ๐˜ฆ๐˜ต ๐˜ต๐˜ฉ๐˜ฆ๐˜ณ๐˜ฆ.)โฃโฃ โฃโฃ So, if you're an empathetic overthinker too, you're not alone.โฃโฃ โฃโฃ ๐€๐ง๐ ๐ญ๐ก๐ž ๐ฐ๐จ๐ซ๐ฅ๐ ๐ง๐ž๐ž๐๐ฌ ๐ฒ๐จ๐ฎ๐ซ ๐ฌ๐ฐ๐ž๐ž๐ญ ๐จ๐ฏ๐ž๐ซ๐š๐œ๐ญ๐ข๐ฏ๐ž ๐ฆ๐ข๐ง๐! :)โฃโฃ โฃโฃ โฃโฃโฃ โฃโฃโฃ โฃโฃโฃ โฃโฃโฃ โฃโฃโฃ โฃโฃโฃ โฃโฃโฃ #empath #overthinker #intuitive #impostersyndrome #impostorsyndrome #mindsetshift #healthymindset #innervoice #innercritic #introspection โฃโฃ #selfreflection #mentalhealthblogger #guidance #theworldneedsyourstory #insight #mommyblog #raiseyourhand #contentcreator

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